News was released about a recent study that reconfirmed the association between diabetes testing and acute myocardial infarction. The study in question was conducted in the U.S. and presented at the American Heart Association’s highly covered, 2014 Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions. Included with the news was a bit of new advice for clinicians.

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Diabetes Health & Questions To Ask Your Doctor

Knowing what questions to ask your doctor will help you better manage your blood glucose (sugar) levels, and that will help you to prevent the onset of health problems that are often associated with diabetes. Following are questions you may want to ask your doctor at your next visit. You may even want to bring this list and a notepad with you.

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It’s hot, tastes good and has been consumed by people since the 15th Century. But is coffee something that people should add to their list of diabetes testing supplies? Well according to some medical researchers, the answer to that inquiry is “Yes!” You can check out two of the 2014 coffee studies for yourself. One was published in the February 2014 issue of the American Diabetes Association’s periodical, Diabetes Care. The other appeared in an April 2014 issue of Diabetologia. Both indicated that coffee consumption has the potential to alter a person’s type 2 diabetes risk. They weren’t the only type 2 diabetes studies to have ever indicated as much either. Similar assertions were made in a 2012 issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Living With ED

All of you men out there who have recently diagnosed with erectile dysfunction are undoubtedly worried about their condition. Many questions may be running through your mind as well. For example: what do I do? What should I tell my partner? Is this the end of my love life? Is there anything I can do to help my condition? These and many other questions can be answered in the following paragraphs. By the end of this article, many men out there will be able to sleep a little better at night knowing that they can easily live with their erectile dysfunction.

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Are you at risk for Type 2 diabetes?

For example, if you are overweight or have a family history of the disease you could be at risk.
Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes later, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage.
Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it’s never too late to start.

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Do you have a history of type 1 diabetes in your family? Are you currently expecting a baby as well? If so, you may want to take a look at the last few issues of the Journal of the American Medical Association’s respected periodical, JAMA Pediatrics.

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Diabetics living in the Golden State may want to take notice of a debate currently taking place among their legislators. That’s because the heated conversation has to do with a bill regarding lancing devices, insulin needles and other similar diabetes testing supplies. If the bill does eventually turn into law, it could change how diabetes testing supplies will need to be sold, purchased and disposed of within the state. Here’s more:

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A study related to gestational diabetes appeared in The Endocrine Society’s publication, the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. It was titled Diabetes and Pregnancy: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline. Upon its release, obstetricians undoubtedly started to question how they’ve been treating diabetic and pre-diabetic pregnant women for years.

The study was actually designed to come up with best practices that physicians could use to treat diabetic women of child bearing age. It looked at pregnant women with a pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes diagnosis as well as those who developed gestational diabetes.

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The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland released an interesting piece of news. It was done in conjunction with the University College Cork’s Sociology Department and focused on recent type 1 diabetes research. According to the Ireland based healthcare professionals’ research, there are several factors that cause young people afflicted with type 1 diabetes to become stressed. They also found that those factors may be mitigated by providing type 1 diabetes sufferers with access to clinical and social support as well as educational materials.

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According to the International Diabetes Foundation’s figures, more than 380 million people around the world are coping with a diabetes diagnosis. That’s a lot of people that must alter their way of living and use type 1 diabetes testing supplies. However, if the researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health are correct, that number may drop in the future.

 

In December 2013, researchers connected with the school’s Hotamisligil Laboratory released the results of a study that revealed a potential way to prevent the disease from occurring. The potential solution to the longstanding disease rests with our endoplasmic reticulum (ER). For those that are unfamiliar with ER, it is an organelle found in some human cells. There are two types. They are referred to as rough and smooth. The rough one aids in protein synthesis. In those with type 1 diabetes, those cells are not functioning properly.

What researchers discovered is that there is an ambiphilic bile acid that has the capability of offsetting that dysfunction in laboratory mice. As a result of that offsetting, the onset of type 1 diabetes may effectively be delayed or stopped altogether. Of course additional research and type 1 diabetes testing must be conducted in the coming years to determine whether or not the same results may be possible to obtain in humans.

Until then, those living with the disease must continue with their type 1 diabetes testing regimens and insulin injections to ensure their quality of life. At this time, failure to properly manage the disease often results in the development of assorted comorbidities. Those comorbidities include vision loss, kidney failure, strokes, heart attacks and blood vessel disease.