Hypoglycemic Supplies

David Mendosa is a freelance journalist and consultant on diabetes. Since 1995, his Web site, www.mendosa.com, has become one of the largest about diabetes. He publishes ‘”Diabetes Update'” online each month and is a coauthor of the book “What Makes My Blood Sugar Go Up and Down.”

Like comedian Rodney Dangerfield, glucose tablets and gels “don’t get no respect.” That’s not good grammar, but nothing else better captures the low regard that many of us have for this wonderful product.

…glucose…is the sugar that our bodies use the fastest.

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National headlines were filled with news about a recent advancement in the treatment of diabetes. It was an advancement that those in the healthcare industry have been fervently working on for years. The diabetes treatment making all of the recent headlines is Medtronic’s APDS, also known as the MiniMed530G.

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The cost to care for diabetics in the United States has increased dramatically over the last five years, but a study conducted by researchers at Wake Forest University may have identified a method to help diabetics better control their health.

The American Diabetes Association estimates that care for diabetics, including diabetes supplies, hospitalizations, medications and other associated expenses cost $245 billion in 2012. The ADA last estimated the total annual costs for diabetics in 2007. At that time, the total cost of diabetes was estimated at $174 billion.

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According to the CDC’s research, diabetes is one of the top five leading causes of death among America’s Latino population. The majority of those that find themselves in that high risk category tend to have type 2 diabetes. Because of that, some members of the scientific research community have long believed that the disease’s prevalence in the Latino community is connected to genetics. So they’ve been conducting research over the last few years to either prove or disprove their assumptions. On December 25, 2013, one of those research groups published their latest findings in Nature magazine.

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For a person living with diabetes, having a blood glucose meter is essential to manage ones condition. Blood glucose levels can be affected by a number of factors, including exercise, food, medications, and stress. The meter works by inserting a test strip in the device. One then pricks a finger to draw a drop of blood which is placed on the test strip. The meter then displays the blood glucose level on a screen.

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If you are one of the many Americans faced with having to use diabetes lancets, you may be excited to learn that there could very well be alternatives available in the near future. Word of the potential alternative was released during the last World Diabetes Congress. Here’s a look at what the advancement is and how it may change diabetics’ lives:

The company making the announcement was Abbott Diabetes Care. The potential advancement is being touted as an ambulatory glucose profile device. It is currently undergoing a clinical trial period. So it is likely to remain unavailable until sometime in the future. Nonetheless, the results thus far have been encouraging.

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Research has shown that the key to reducing or avoiding diabetic complications is keeping the blood sugar tightly controlled; glucose meters are the main tool used to accomplish this. Currently there are about 75 different meters available in the United States with prices ranging from less than $10 to about $75. But take note: the price of the glucose meter does not necessarily reflect its quality or accuracy.

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Many glucose meters can last more than 10 years and still function normally. If you’ve had your glucose meter for a while, you may be wondering when you should consider replacing it. The key to knowing when it’s time for new equipment primarily lies with the accuracy of your machine. Even so, you may still want to consider investing in a new meter in order to take advantage of improved technology.

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Diabetes is a chronic disease that can damage the heart, blood vessels, kidneys, eyes and nerves over time. Nearly 347 million people worldwide have diabetes, according to World Health Organization (WHO). Diabetes increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, blindness, foot ulcers and kidney failure. Overall, risk of dying is at least double among people with diabetes than people without diabetes.

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