Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) with home blood glucose monitors is essential. The blood glucose (BG) results are used to assess the efficacy of therapy, and to provide data by which to make management decisions. Typically, patients who use insulin should be SMBG at least 3-4 times per day. Some type 1’s check as much as 6-8 times per day.† Individuals with type 2 diabetes should SMBG, but if well controlled they may need somewhat less frequent checks. Patients on diet therapy without medications may only need to check BG a few times per week. Type 2’s using oral agents should check at least 1-2 times daily, and vary the times.

When BG control is sub-optimal, frequency of monitoring should be increased to provide data for therapy changes. To assure proper technique, patients should receive training on meter use.

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Cooking with Herbs

You have decided to cook with some delicious herbs but do not know how to cook with them. Then you wait and your fresh herbs go bad. Herbs can be bought fresh, or dried. You can even grow them in your own home. Herbs are flavoring agents used for enriching or altering the flavor or odor of foods. Herbs make a dish complete. Different herbs have different uses. Herbs add great flavor to your dishes but also contain many healthy nutrients.

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Delicious Mediterranean Foods

A heart-healthy eating plan, called the Mediterranean diet might be the right diet for you. This diet is based on the traditional foods eaten by people living in the Mediterranean region especially in Greece. The Mediterranean diet is a delicious and healthy way to eat. It incorporates the basics of healthy eating and is low in saturated fat, very high in fiber and antioxidants from vegetables, legumes and nuts. Very little red meat is eaten in this diet and milk consumption is limited as well, except for some cheese and yogurt. Research has shown that the traditional Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of heart disease and may be associated with a reduced risk of overall and cardiovascular mortality, a reduced incidence of cancer and cancer mortality, and a reduced incidence of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

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Choosing An Insulin Pump Can Be Difficult

Insulin pumps represent a giant step forwards in diabetes management. Instead of constantly preparing and administering insulin by injection, pumps allows users to fine-tune their insulin delivery. Pumps as a whole and specific pumps in particular have both pros and cons for different types of users, however, so it is vital to read up on what is available.

Most conventional insulin users will mix shorter and longer-acting types of insulin to attempt to get blood sugar control over an entire 24-hour period. This is important because high blood sugar can have serious short and long-term consequences, but is annoying at best. Pumps remove this necessity as they can deliver short-acting insulin constantly. Users trigger a ‘bolus’ or larger dose based on their carbohydrate intake when they eat and receive a low, calculated dose at all other times.

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Healthy Mushrooms

Mushrooms are known for its heal>thy nutrients and when used right in cooking can enhance the flavor of many different dishes. You can find mushrooms as toppings in hamburgers, steaks and pizza. Or mushrooms are eaten raw or added to salads, soups, casseroles, rice dishes, stir-fry and scrambled eggs.
Mushrooms supply the diet with vegetable proteins, vitamins, amino acids, minerals, fiber, iron plus they are low in calories. Nutritionally, mushrooms contain important vitamins like vitamin D and B vitamins and minerals like potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, selenium, copper and zinc. These vitamins and minerals play an important role to boost immune system and to keep your body healthy. A number of edible mushrooms are available and easy to buy.

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Nutrient Dense Foods Benefit Diabetes Patients

Why would you choose a piece of fresh fruit for a snack over a bag of pretzels?  What is the healthier choice?

These foods have roughly the same number of calories, but not in nutrients.  The fresh fruit provides fiber, vitamin C and potassium for an equal number of calories. Which means the piece of fruit has a higher nutrient density. 

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Healthy Fats Key To Diabetic Nutrition

Different foods contain several different kinds of fats.  The potential harmful dietary fats are called saturated and Trans fats.  These fats come mostly from animal sources.  They can negatively affect total blood cholesterol levels, HDL and LDL cholesterol levels which can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease.  These fats are solid at room temperature.  Examples include: beef and pork fat, shortening, stick butter and margarine and baked goods.  You want to include healthy fats in your diet which are known as monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, and omega-3 fatty acids.

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Chia Seeds

Chia is an edible seed that comes from the desert plant Salvia hispanica, a member of the mint family grown in southern Mexico. Historically, this seed was a main diet component of the Mayan and Aztec cultures. “Chia” means strength, and folklore has it that these cultures used the tiny black and white seeds as an energy booster which was most likely due to the nutritious ingredients found in the seeds.

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Watercress Healthy for Diabetes

Watercress is a cruciferous vegetable that belongs to the mustard family. It has small leaves and the stems have a peppery flavor. Watercress is the most ancient of green vegetables known to man and its use can be traced back to the Persians, Greeks and Romans. The delicious, peppery flavor of watercress is great when you have to spice up soups like minestrone or vegetable soups, casseroles, dips, entrees and salads. It also makes a great addition to most sandwich fillings. This bright green, leafy vegetable can also be consumed in a juice form or used as a garnish. It is recognized as a super-vegetable due to its rich content of vitamins and minerals.

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Health Fruits & Folic Acid

Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells, meaning it is important for cell growth and metabolism. “Folic acid” and “folate” mean the same thing. They have the same effects. Folic acid is a man-made form of folate and is in supplements and added to foods. Folate is found naturally in certain foods. Studies show that many people in the U.S. don’t get enough folic acid in their diets.

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