What are the different Types Of Diabetes?

Diabetes is a group of diseases that result in too much sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream. The most common Types Of Diabetes are:

Types Of Diabetes: Type 1 diabetes

Results from the body’s failure to produce insulin, the hormone that unlocks the cells of the body, allowing glucose to enter and fuel them. It is estimated that 5-10% of Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Most treatment is administered with insulin pumps.

Having type 1 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 1 diabetes include heart disease (cardiovascular disease), blindness (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), and kidney damage (nephropathy).

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An article appeared in the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics that caught our eye. It shined a spotlight on a recent Diabetic ketoacidosis study and diabetes testing supplies. We found it interesting for several reasons, the subject matter being one of them.

The ketoacidosis study focused on youth that were diagnosed with diabetes and how important early detection can be in regards to overall health outcomes. What the study’s team found was that many people are not familiar with the condition or the diabetes testing supplies that may be used to help detect it before the person’s health deteriorates.

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Fresh Fruit And Vegetables Month (National Month Celebration) is celebrated every month of June, so why don’t you challenge yourself to eat more fresh produce this month!

Fruits and vegetables are nutrient-dense, which means they provide lots of vitamins and minerals with fewer calories. They also contain fiber to keep you feeling full, and antioxidants that may protect you against certain chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. The USDA MyPlate guidelines recommend filling half of your plate with fruits and vegetables. That means most of us should eat 1.5-2 cups of fruit per day AND 2-3 cups of vegetables per day. If you choose, you can consume fruits and vegetables that are canned, frozen, dried, and in 100% juices.

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How Many Meals Per Day Should People With Diabetes Eat?

For years many Americans have lived with the misguided notion that it is better to eat a series of small meals each day as opposed to three large ones. Recently more information was released that further disproves the age-old myth. Only this time, the researchers involved looked directly at the relationship between meal frequency and diabetes.

The study in the New England Journal of Medicine indicated that opting to consume three appropriately-sized meals a day may be best for blood glucose control, vs several small meals throughout the day. They feel that adopting such a routine may make diabetes management, at least for those diagnosed with type 2, much easier and more effective.

To better understand what those meals should be comprised of, diabetics should consider speaking with members of their healthcare team. There are also a series of breakfast and lunch meal ideas for diabetics available online. One good resource is the American Diabetes Association. They have a list of speedy-to-prepare breakfast, lunch, and dinner ideas that all diabetics may find helpful.

Recommended Foods for Diabetes

Let’s take a look at the important foods that people with diabetes should include in their meal planning.

understand-which-food-are best-for-diabetes

Breakfast

Try to include a protein-rich egg or low-fat meat with your breakfast. If you’re on the go, try making a veggie and fruit smoothie with a scoop of your favorite sugar-free protein powder.

Lunch

A light salad is always a good choice. Add greens, tomatoes, cucumbers, and other veggies you enjoy — also add protein in the form of boiled eggs, turkey meat, or tofu cubes. Watch out for take-out or restaurant salads as they can include unhealthy carbs and fatty dressings that are not heart or diabetes healthy. A homemade dressing such as olive oil and balsamic vinegar is an easy and diabetes-friendly option.

Dinner

For dinner, focus on lean proteins, whole grains, and more vegetables. Grilled chicken with asparagus and quinoa is an example of a diabetes-friendly delicious meal.

Conclusion

Of course, study aside, the use of diabetes testing supplies, frequent exercise and maintaining contact with one’s primary care physician are still widely advised by today’s experts. The list of approved, contemporary diabetes testing supplies includes glucose meters, lancets, control solution and more. Advanced Diabetes Supply is a leading national supplier of all diabetes testing supplies. We offer free shipping on all supplies, so contact us to get started today!

For those newly diagnosed with diabetes, we are here to help. Diabetes is a lot to live with, but really, it is manageable! In this article we’ll define a few terms about diabetes and provide a few basic tips to help keep you on track.

Meet An Endocrinologist

For the newly diagnosed the first thing to do is get a good doctor, if possible an endocrinologist, who is a doctor that specializes in diabetes. Have the doctor give you the tests that all people with diabetes are familiar with: the A1C. This test is vital to managing diabetes and the A1C number is an important stat for those managing diabetes to know. Simply put, an A1C is the 3-month average of one’s blood sugar levels.

using-a-glucometer Next, the doctor will prescribe a blood glucose meter, test strips, and lancets so blood glucose levels can be read at home. In most states, if you have a prescription for them they must be covered under your insurance policy. Test as often as the doctor says to or even more if you can afford more strips. The more you test, the more knowledge you will gain, and that will allow you to make better decisions regarding your care.

Find A Community

Learning about diabetes on the internet and through books will give you even more power over the disease. Don’t hesitate to “network” with others living with diabetes. Even from afar, getting support from others in the trenches with you will help stave off feelings of isolation and provide helpful advice from other who get it.

  • America Diabetes Association The ADA is great source of knowledge and support for those living with diabetes.
  • Centers for Disease Control The CDC has an extremely helpful diabetes hub and will keep you informed on the latest in medications and threats to your health.
  • Facebook Of course, Facebook has a wealth of private groups that make it simple to ask questions and receive crowd-sourced answers from those living with diabetes. Simply search for “diabetes” in Facebook’s search bar and you’ll be instantly connected with others dealing with similar diabetes-related issues.

Three Main Diabetes Management Tips

Besides this, everything that you can do to bring your diabetes under control falls under three headings, listed here.

1. Exercise daily.

Exercise is one of the simplest ways to manage diabetes. The CDC recommends that those with diabetes exercise daily for at least 20 minutes. That can be a daily walk, yoga, or other light activities. Start small and just concentrate on listening to your body and elevating your heart rate for 20 minutes. It really makes a difference! Be sure to consult with your doctor before starting an exercise routine.

2. Track what you eat.

Know how the food you eat impacts your blood sugar. You’ll find that eating fewer calories improves blood sugar even before any weight loss, and weight loss is usually a beneficial side effect of eating less. Try using a phone app like Fooducate to make it easier to track caloric intake.

3. Follow the doctor’s orders.

For some people living with diabetes, tips one and two aren’t enough. Take the medicine or insulin that the doctor prescribes and pay attention to their management advice. In between appointments write down any unanswered questions or thoughts that you have about your diabetes care in a journal so you can make the most of your doctor’s visits.

We hope this helps those newly diagnosed with diabetes feel a sense of control. Remember that Advanced Diabetes Supply offers a wealth of helpful information, products, and help, including on-staff Certified Diabetes Educators. Join our Facebook page to stay connected and to learn more!

Blood sugar control: Exercise helps to lower blood sugar in two ways. First of all, exercise decreases insulin resistance, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Secondly, exercise increases glucose disposal. An exercising muscle simply uses more sugar than a resting muscle.

Weight control: Besides burning glucose, exercise burns fat, which helps with weight control. Excess body fat increases insulin resistance and worsens type 2 diabetes. Achieving and maintaining a reasonable weight is a key to preventing and treating type 2 diabetes.

Blood sugar control: Exercise helps to lower blood sugar in two ways. First of all, exercise decreases insulin resistance, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Secondly, exercise increases glucose disposal. An exercising muscle simply uses more sugar than a resting muscle.

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Approximately 50 million Americans have hypertension. That is one out of every four adults. If you are African American, make that one out of three. High blood pressure tends to run in families. It strikes more often in people over 35 years old, and by age 65, more than half of us will have high blood pressure. Women are especially susceptible after menopause. Birth control pills may cause hypertension in some women. Although more common in adults, hypertension can still affect young adults and even children. People with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to have hypertension.

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The use of sugar, sweeteners, and sugar substitutes has often been a topic of hot debate. Until recently, using sugar has been discouraged in the Diabetic Meal Plan. Current scientific studies have not supported the necessity of completely abstaining from sugar, and now it’s becoming widely accepted that sugar may be used in moderation without causing deterioration in blood sugar control. Countless studies have investigated the safety profiles of artificial sweeteners.

Misinformation is rampant regarding the safety and acceptability of using both sugar and artificial sweeteners. A fair amount of alarmist propaganda is out there, mixed in with medical facts.

Listen with a critical ear. Try to review the scientific studies, not the hearsay. Consider the source of the information. In the end, the decision of what to use is up to you.

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Pregnancy (Diabetes during Pregnancy) is a wondrous and exciting time. Itís a time of change, both physically and emotionally. With the proper attention and prenatal medical care, most women with diabetes can enjoy their pregnancies and welcome a healthy baby into their lives.

Why Tight Blood Sugar Control Is Critically Important for women with Diabetes During Pregnancy

Blood sugar control is important from the first week of pregnancy all the way until delivery. Organogenesis takes place in the first trimester. Uncontrolled blood sugar during the early weeks of pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, and birth defects. (Women donít develop gestational diabetes until later in pregnancy, which means they don’t share these early pregnancy risks.)

Later in the pregnancy, uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause fetal macrosomia, which may lead to shoulder dystocia, fractures, and the need for Cesarean section deliveries. Very high blood sugar levels can increase the risk of stillbirth.

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Eating right is essential to keeping your mind and body running at its best. During this year’s National Nutrition Month, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics reminds us to build an eating plan with your unique lifestyle and nutritional needs in mind. So whether you’re a career professional, vegetarian, student, athlete, or busy parent, it’s important to “Eat Right, Your Way, Every Day.”

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