Can a whole egg eaten at breakfast raise my blood cholesterol levels?  Well, a couple of decades ago, eggs had a not-so-popular reputation and it was decided that the cholesterol in eggs could clog your arteries.  Now, more and more research is proving that one egg per day does not result in increased blood cholesterol levels, nor does it increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in healthy people.  The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 state that consuming less than 300 mg per day of cholesterol can help maintain normal blood cholesterol levels.  Plus, consuming less than 200 mg per day can further help individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease.

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Working with Medicare is one of the biggest challenges for people seeking coverage of diabetes supplies and services. ‘”People have a hard time with Medicare,'” says Tim Cady of Advanced Diabetes Supply (www.northcoastmed.com.), a division of North Coast Medical Supply in San Diego.

Tim should know because his national mail-order diabetes company specializes in helping people who have insurance get their testing and insulin pump supplies. Medicare is the nation’s largest health insurance program, covering about 40 million people.

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In May 2014, a report released jointly by the California Center for Public Health Advocacy and the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research reconfirmed what many have known for some time now, Latinos have a very high risk for developing diabetes. The reason for the prevalence has long been discussed. Just last year, researchers published findings indicating that genetics may play a serious role in it. But more research still needs to be done on the topic.

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Until recently most treatments for diabetic neuropathy have been painkillers that helped some people but not others. Even if they helped control the pain, they did nothing to reverse the neuropathy. My web page on “Diabetic Neuropathy” describes many of these treatments.

About half of us have some degree of neuropathy. It is probably the most common complication of diabetes.

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Halloween is here, a time of celebration filled with mystery, fun costumes, and sweet treats. But treats for Halloween (Healthy Halloween Food Ideas) do not have to be just chocolate and candy. Try serving these delicious and healthy treats in your home for the whole family.

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David Mendosa is a freelance journalist and consultant on diabetes. Since 1995, his Web site, www.mendosa.com, has become one of the largest about diabetes. He publishes ‘”Diabetes Update'” online each month and is a coauthor of the book “What Makes My Blood Sugar Go Up and Down.”

Like comedian Rodney Dangerfield, glucose tablets and gels “don’t get no respect.” That’s not good grammar, but nothing else better captures the low regard that many of us have for this wonderful product (Diabetic Testing Supplies).

…glucose…is the sugar that our bodies use the fastest.

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The news was released about a recent study that reconfirmed the association between diabetes testing and acute myocardial infarction (Acute MI Treatment). The study in question was conducted in the U.S. and presented at the American Heart Association’s highly coveted, 2014 Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions. Included with the news was a bit of new advice for clinicians.

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Knowing what questions to ask your doctor will help you better manage your blood sugar Glucose levels, and that will help you to prevent the onset of health problems that are often associated with diabetes. Following are questions you may want to ask your doctor at your next visit. You may even want to bring this list and a notepad with you.

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National headlines were filled with news about recent advancements in the treatment of diabetes (Artificial Pancreas Device System). It was an advancement that those in the healthcare industry have been fervently working on for years. The diabetes treatment making all of the recent headlines is Medtronic’s APDS, also known as the MiniMed530G.

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It’s hot, tastes good and has been consumed by people since the 15th Century. But is coffee something that people should add to their list of diabetes testing supplies? Well according to some medical researchers, the answer to that inquiry is “Yes!” You can check out two of the 2014 coffee studies for yourself. One was published in the February 2014 issue of the American Diabetes Association’s periodical, Diabetes Care. The other appeared in an April 2014 issue of Diabetologia. Both indicated that coffee consumption has the potential to alter a person’s type 2 diabetes risk. They weren’t the only type 2 diabetes studies to have ever indicated as much either. Similar assertions were made in a 2012 issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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