Insulin Pumps

The Insulin Pumpers mailing list that took shape this year is certainly highly specialized. But for those people with diabetes who are looking for the tightest possible control, if offers knowledgeable advice from pumpers and their parents. That candy meant more to him than anyone could imagine.

For Rose Lulla, the mailing list encouraged her to find an endocrinologist who would put her 10-year-old son Ravi on a pump. “Doctors here in Omaha, Nebraska, don’t have much interest in putting kids younger than 12 or 13 on the pump,” she tells me.

Ravi had got his diagnosis on his seventh birthday. In October his mother and he joined the Insulin Pumpers mailing list, and about two weeks later he began to use a pump.

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Diabetes Testing Supplies

When it comes to blood glucose testing, with only a little simplification there are three types of people in the world – those who use insulin, those who control their diabetes without insulin, and those who don’t yet have diabetes.

People with type 1 diabetes and pregnant women who take insulin need to test at least three times a day, according to The American Diabetes Association’s Position Statement on Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes. But the recommendations are murky for people with type 2 diabetes who use insulin and anyone changing therapy and are especially murky for people who control their diabetes on diet alone. The statement doesn’t even consider people who control their diabetes with pills or with exercise.

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Diabetes Testing Supplies

An article appeared in the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics that caught our eye. It shined a spotlight on a recent ketoacidosis study and diabetes testing supplies. We found it interesting for several reasons, the subject matter being one of them.

The ketoacidosis study focused on youth that were diagnosed with diabetes and how important early detection can be in regards to overall health outcomes. What the study’s team found was that many people are not familiar with the condition or the diabetes testing supplies that may be used to help detect it before the person’s health deteriorates.

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Today we have many types of insulin and delivery systems available to us. Which is right for you? Work with your doctor to determine if you need as few as one or as many as four or five injections per day. It will depend on what type of diabetes you have, your age and ability to manage low blood sugar reactions and your lifestyle.

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Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) with home blood glucose monitors is essential. The blood glucose (BG) results are used to assess the efficacy of therapy, and to provide data by which to make management decisions. Typically, patients who use insulin should be SMBG at least 3-4 times per day. Some type 1’s check as much as 6-8 times per day.† Individuals with type 2 diabetes should SMBG, but if well controlled they may need somewhat less frequent checks. Patients on diet therapy without medications may only need to check BG a few times per week. Type 2’s using oral agents should check at least 1-2 times daily, and vary the times.

When BG control is sub-optimal, frequency of monitoring should be increased to provide data for therapy changes. To assure proper technique, patients should receive training on meter use.

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Choosing An Insulin Pump Can Be Difficult

Insulin pumps represent a giant step forwards in diabetes management. Instead of constantly preparing and administering insulin by injection, pumps allows users to fine-tune their insulin delivery. Pumps as a whole and specific pumps in particular have both pros and cons for different types of users, however, so it is vital to read up on what is available.

Most conventional insulin users will mix shorter and longer-acting types of insulin to attempt to get blood sugar control over an entire 24-hour period. This is important because high blood sugar can have serious short and long-term consequences, but is annoying at best. Pumps remove this necessity as they can deliver short-acting insulin constantly. Users trigger a ‘bolus’ or larger dose based on their carbohydrate intake when they eat and receive a low, calculated dose at all other times.

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Glucose Meter Control Solutions

In order to get the most accurate readings from your monitor, you should make sure that you use control solution. Its purpose is to make sure that your meter is working properly and calibrated correctly. By not using control solution you run the risk of getting blood sugar readings that are not right. If you give yourself insulin based on a test result that is not precise, you could very well end up higher or lower than your target range. By using control solution frequently you greatly decrease the potential for unnecessary blood sugar fluctuations.

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Baby & Father

According to American Diabetes Association figures, more than 215,000 people under the age of 20 are coping with a diabetes diagnosis. If your child recently became one of them, you probably have lots of questions about diabetic supplies. We here at Advanced Diabetes Supply understand that need for knowledge. That’s why we’d like to take a few moments to talk about diabetes lancets.

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Diabetic Monitoring Phone App

According to the American Diabetes Association the total prevalence of diabetes is as follows:
Total: 25.8 million children and adults in the United States—8.3% of the population—have diabetes.
Diagnosed: 18.8 million people
Undiagnosed: 7.0 million people
Prediabetes: 79 million people
New Cases: 1.9 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older.

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Cinnamon Sticks

The Annals of Family Medicine published the results of an attention-grabbing study on type 2 diabetes. The study was conducted by representatives of California’s Western University of Health Sciences. What the California researchers’ work revealed may startle you.

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